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We are offering complimentary consultations with our experienced attorneys via phone, Skype, FaceTime and Zoom to anyone – individuals, businesses and organizations – with a situation and/or questions related to immigration and nationality law. We can advise or offer second opinions on family-based and employment based immigration options, employer compliance, maintenance of non-immigrant status and employment authorization, political asylum, removal defense, remedies through federal court litigation or other U.S. immigration matters. Please contact us 24/7 at (312) 444-1940 or consult@lawfirm1.com.

Certificates of Citizenship

Certificates of Citizenship

A Certificate of Citizenship is an identifying document proving United States citizenship. Certification of citizenship is obtained by citizens who have acquired citizenship through various ways such as adoption, naturalization, or by birth.

Types of U.S. Citizenship Validation

Before applying for a Certificate of Citizenship, you need to obtain primary or secondary citizenship evidence of your citizenship if you were born in or outside the United States. If you were born outside of the United States and obtained citizenship through a parent or through adoption, you may need a different set of documents to prove citizenship.

Primary Citizenship Evidence is proof for those born in the United States.  A birth certificate will qualify for a Certificate of Citizenship. A U.S. born citizen’s birth certificate will be issued by the city, county, or state of birth. It will also include the full name, date and place of birth, parent(s) name(s), and have a seal of authority. For those born outside of the United States, primary citizenship evidence can be proven by passport, or Certificate of Naturalization.

Secondary Citizenship Evidence is proof of citizenship for those who do not have the documents listed above. In this case, citizenship be proven by a delayed birth certificate. Delayed birth certificates are typically filed more than a year after birth and should still contain signature of a birth attendant or parent(s). If a birth certificate is not on file in the state you were born, a Letter of No Record will be issued instead of a birth certificate. A Letter of No Record must have the applicant’s name, date of birth, and a statement that no birth certificate was on file.

Evidence of Citizenship at Birth is proof of citizenship for those who were born outside the United States and acquired citizenship through a parent who is a U.S. citizen. To prove citizenship, you may submit a foreign birth certificate with your valid passport, parent(s)’ evidence of U.S. citizenship, parent’s marriage certificate (if applicable), and a statement from U.S. citizen parent(s) detailing physical presence in the U.S.

Evidence of Citizenship through Adoption is proof for those who have acquired citizenship through adoption. Citizens through adoption may present their full and final adoption decree as well as evidence of lawful entry for permanent residence.

For additional information or questions on obtaining your Certificate of Citizenship, visit the U.S. Department of State website.

Applying for Certificate of Citizenship

To apply for a Certificate of Citizenship, you will need to fill out and submit Form N-600, Application for Certificate of Citizenship with the U.S. Embassy or Consulate (USCIS). The N-600 application can assist U.S. citizens in receiving their proof of citizenship. If you were born in the United States, you will not need to apply to USCIS for evidence of citizenship – your birth certificate issued at birth is your proof.

Contact an Experienced Immigration Attorney Today

Our attorneys have over seven decades of combined experience in U.S. immigration law. We’ve helped guide numerous clients through the process of obtaining Certificates of Citizenship in the U.S. Contact the legal team at Scott D. Pollock & Associates, P.C. today. Contact a member of our team today at 312.444.1940.

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