Blog archive for category General

Scott D. Pollock to Participate in Northwest Suburban Bar Association (NWSBA) Employment Law CLE Seminar

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SDP&A attorney Scott D. Pollock will participate in an employment law seminar for Continuing Legal Education (CLE) sponsored by the Northwest Suburban Bar Association (NWSBA).  The seminar will take place on October 21, 2014 from 12PM to 3:15PM at the Westwood Tavern in Schaumburg.  Mr. Pollock will discuss immigration issues in employment matters such as visa status, employment authorization, employer I-9 compliance, and what to do if U.S. Immigration & Customs Enforcement (ICE) raids your client’s business.

© 2014 Scott D. Pollock & Associates, P.C.

Contact Us

For questions and/or to arrange a consultation with one of our attorneys, please call (312) 444-1940 or send us an e-mail atinfo@lawfirm1.com.  You may also visit our Contact Us page for more detailed contact information.

Disclaimer

The materials contained in this website have been prepared by Scott D. Pollock & Associates, P.C. for informational purposes only and are not legal advice or counsel.

SDP&A attorneys to participate at AILA Fall Business Immigration Conference

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SDP&A attorneys Scott D. Pollock and Elizabeth Rompf Bruen will participate as speakers at the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) Chicago Chapter’s Fall Business Immigration Conference.  The conference will be held at the Chicago Bar Association on October 17 from 7:45AM to 1:00PM. Mr. Pollock’s panel will discuss issues when dealing with F1 students.  Ms. Rompf Bruen’s panel will cover work with start-ups and dealing with corporate changes.

© 2014 Scott D. Pollock & Associates, P.C.

Contact Us

For questions and/or to arrange a consultation with one of our attorneys, please call (312) 444-1940 or send us an e-mail atinfo@lawfirm1.com.  You may also visit our Contact Us page for more detailed contact information.

Disclaimer

The materials contained in this website have been prepared by Scott D. Pollock & Associates, P.C. for informational purposes only and are not legal advice or counsel.

SDP&A attorneys to attend AILA EB5 Investors and Regional Centers Conference

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SDP&A attorneys Scott D. Pollock and Christina Murdoch will attend the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) EB5 Investors and Regional Centers Conference.  The two day conference will take place in the Radisson Blu Aqua Hotel on August 22 and 23.  This conference is for attorneys representing individual investors and regional centers and those who want to break into or advance in this area.  Panels led by attorneys, and featuring economists and securities lawyers, will discuss issues such as Targeted Employment Areas (TEAs), Security Compliance, Econometric Models, Regional Center Affiliations, Exit Strategies, among others.

© 2014 Scott D. Pollock & Associates, P.C.

Contact Us

For questions and/or to arrange a consultation with one of our attorneys, please call (312) 444-1940 or send us an e-mail atinfo@lawfirm1.com.  You may also visit our Contact Us page for more detailed contact information.

Disclaimer

The materials contained in this website have been prepared by Scott D. Pollock & Associates, P.C. for informational purposes only and are not legal advice or counsel.

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Scott D. Pollock recognized for his participation in AILA committee

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Scott D. Pollock was recognized by AILA’s outgoing President Douglas Stump for serving as Vice Chair of Student and Scholars Committee during the 2013-2014 term.  The AILA Student and Scholars Committee works on issues affecting international students and scholars.  Mr. Stump commented, “Together we have accomplished great things as we worked to advance our mission, and serve our members, our clients, and by extension, our communities.”  He added, “I am proud to call myself a member of the American Immigration Lawyers Association and I am equally proud of volunteer leaders such as you.”

© 2014 Scott D. Pollock & Associates, P.C.

Contact Us

For questions and/or to arrange a consultation with one of our attorneys, please call (312) 444-1940 or send us an e-mail atinfo@lawfirm1.com.  You may also visit our Contact Us page for more detailed contact information.

Disclaimer

The materials contained in this website have been prepared by Scott D. Pollock & Associates, P.C. for informational purposes only and are not legal advice or counsel.

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Marriage-Based Green Card Interviews-Not to be Taken for Granted

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by Christina Murdoch

All people applying for a green card from within the United States based on marriage to a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident must attend an interview at a U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) office with their spouse.  The purpose of these interviews is primarily to determine if the marriage was made in good faith, that is was not for the sole purpose of getting a green card for the foreign national spouse.  Couples who have married in good faith may assume that this interview will be no problem and that, as the immigration service is supposed to ask them questions any legitimately married couple would know about each other, they will be able to answer with ease.  For many couples this is true, and the interview is a routine matter.  But for others, the interview is a more difficult experience and the questions asked are better described as things a legitimately married couple might know about each other rather than things they would always know.

There are essentially two types of marriage-based green card interviews that the immigration service conducts.  The simpler kind is a short interview of the couple together in which the interviewing officer asks them some basic questions about their relationship such as when and how they met, when they got engaged, etc.  The more complicated kind is known as a Stokes interview.  In these interviews the couple is questioned separately, and the interviewing officer compares their answers to make sure they are consistent.  These interviews are longer, the questions asked are more detailed and demanding, and the couple may be asked to read and sign separate written statements under oath documenting what they have said.  Often these written statements are used as a basis to deny the green card application.

When are Stokes interviews conducted?

Stokes interviews are usually conducted when the immigration service is suspicious that the marriage is not bona fide.  This can happen because of significant differences in the couple’s background, education, religion, culture, or age.  It can also happen because an initial interview or documents given to the immigration service in support of the green card application disclosed discrepancies in a couple’s explanation of their relationship.  If a couple is being re-interviewed, there is a high likelihood that the second interview will be a Stokes interview.  To prevent a Stokes interview, couples are well advised to hire a good immigration lawyer who will review their supporting documents to make sure they are consistent and who will adequately prepare them for any issues or difficult questions that may come up in an initial interview.

Preparing for a Stokes interview

If a couple suspects that a Stokes interview is likely, they should not assume that they are well-prepared simply because they have a legitimate marriage.  Some questions that are asked at a Stokes interview can be surprisingly difficult, even for bona fide couples to answer, if they are not prepared in advance for what might be asked.  For example, officers often ask couples what they did the night before the interview.  Many people could easily answer this question, but when couples are living busy lives, the activities of one particular evening may slip their mind.  Officers also sometimes ask people how many rooms are in their house or to describe particular rooms.  This question could easily trip up someone who is uninterested in the interior design of their home and who has lived there for years without thinking in detail about how many rooms it has or what those rooms look like.  Other common questions in Stokes interviews are requests to name certain relatives of your spouse (i.e. parents, siblings) and to say where they live or to provide the name and address of the employer of your spouse.  In addition to being prepared for the questioning of a Stokes interview, couples anticipating such an interview should be prepared to be asked to sign a written statement under oath.  Signing such a statement is a serious business because it is very difficult to later take back something signed to in these statements.  Therefore, before signing one, you must read every word of the statement and make sure you understand everything in the statement.  If anything in the statement is incorrect, you must insist that it be changed, and, if the officer refuses to change it, you must refuse to sign the statement.  Because of the need to prepare carefully for Stokes interviews and the fact that such interviews are evidence that the immigration service is suspicious of the marriage, representation by a good lawyer during Stokes interviews is essential.

© 2014 Scott D. Pollock & Associates, P.C.

Contact Us

For questions and/or to arrange a consultation with one of our attorneys, please call (312) 444-1940 or send us an e-mail at info@lawfirm1.com.  You may also visit our Contact Us page for more detailed contact information.

Disclaimer

The materials contained in this website have been prepared by Scott D. Pollock & Associates, P.C. for informational purposes only and are not legal advice or counsel.

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